Hacking the Career: What Should Organizations Do

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As we look at the research from Deloitte Human Capital Trends 2016 and talk with clients, it's becoming increasingly clear that one of the biggest "broken" parts of our companies is the way we manage people's careers.

We are embarking on a major research study of this topic, one which we hope will uncover many new ideas, best-practices, and models of maturity. In the meantime, I've taken some time to put together my perspectives on this issue, and I welcome you to read the article.  (Link here

What I think you'll find is that career management in organizations has become a highly strategic issue:  how we decide who moves into leadership, what leaders do, how we facilitate professional development, and how we help people move from role to role – all touch the nerve of our entire system for rewards, structure, and strategy.

I believe this is a fascinating and very important topic, if you would like to discuss your company's career management strategy please let us know.  

Josh Bersin

Josh Bersin writes on the ever-changing landscape of business-driven learning, HR and talent management. His favorite topics include strategic talent management, creating high-impact learning organizations, and how organizations drive business change and competitive advantage through talent strategy and technology.

4 thoughts on “Hacking the Career: What Should Organizations Do

  1. I work for a SME in London that employs knowledge workers who develop sustainable systems and transfer agile knowledge to our customers.

    We have done some really interesting stuff in terms of career progression. Our values are Learning, Innovating, Delivering and Sharing. We believe that the way people live these values is through conferencing, networking and teaching each other what they know. We offer innovation days for people to develop on personal interests with relevant business value and we encourage people to use their learning to continuously improve how we deliver our services. We have sensible mentoring parings and inspect and adapt frequently to share what we find with the organisation

    To empower people we have made them the product owners of their growth in the organisation. We believe that more choice people have over how they do that, the more they grow into the people that they want to be and into the people we value as our greatest asset. This has led to increased engagement and reduced attrition rates.

    I look forward to learning more about how others tackle this problem in an ever changing, employee-driven market.

  2. I am looking forward to this research! May I ask that you also look into how organizations can help the less-talented employees? As a project manager, I am often not given the best talent because, those folks are too vital to be shared. What I have had to do is develop the employees that I were given into a high-performing team. A lot of what I did was hit-or-miss but, I was able to turn some folks into highly-motivated and highly-talented employees.

    I think that if your research showed a more systematic way of motivating and transforming employees into the sought-after talented people, it would be very helpful to practitioners.

    Bill Brantley

  3. Josh,

    I am delighted to see that you are doing some research into this area. I have always been dismayed that many organisation’s don’t recognise that talented people are always very good at managing their careers. And if organisation’s don’t support them to manage their careers inside the company, they will mange their career outside the company. I developed the Career Conversation Toolkit to help managers have conversations with their employees about their careers http://www.antoinetteoglethorpe.com/career-conversation-toolkit/

    I look forward to seeing the results of your search.

    Antoinette

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